Book References2018-11-20T21:10:50+00:00

Required Book/Blog Reading

Atomic Insights: Publisher: Rod Adams – This blog provides very rich current content as well as an archive of accurate and clear information about atomic energy, its competition, its risks and benefits as a technology as well as its role within the clean energy quiver to help mankind avoid climate change. Adams is an atomic energy expert with more than 25 years of experience in making atomic energy information accessible to the public. He is a retired Commander in the US Navy. Former Engineer Officer, USS Von Steuben, the founder of Adams Atomic Engines, Inc., and host and producer of the The Atomic Show Podcast.

Campaigning for Clean Air: Strategies for Pro-Nuclear Advocacy, by Meredith Angwin, 2016. Meredith Angwin is a materials scientist, author and long-time nuclear advocate. She was one of the first women to be a project manager at the Electric Power Research Institute.

“Nuclear is now gaining recognition as not only desirable but necessary in the effort to provide needed energy for the world in an environmentally responsible manner. Meredith’s book provides practical tools for nuclear advocates to ensure that our existing nuclear assets are preserved and that new nuclear power facilities are licensed. This book is a must read for anyone engaging with the public on nuclear power issues.” — Eugene S. Grecheck, Past President, American Nuclear Society

Climate of Hope: How Cities, Businesses, and Citizens Can Save the Planet, by Michael Bloomberg and Carl Pope 2017

“From Mayor Michael Bloomberg and former head of the Sierra Club Carl Pope comes a manifesto on how the benefits of taking action on climate change are concrete, immediate, and immense. They explore climate change solutions that will make the world healthier and more prosperous, aiming to begin a new type of conversation on the issue that will spur bolder action by cities, businesses, and citizens―and even, someday, by Washington.”
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Keeping the Lights on at America’s Nuclear Power Plants, by Jeremy Carl and David Fedor of the Hoover Institute, August 2017

In Keeping the Lights On at America’s Nuclear Power Plants, Jeremy Carl and David Fedor discuss the decline of American nuclear power in light of major economic, technological and political challenges. They show how high costs, low public support, and popular clean energy trends threaten America’s near- and long-term nuclear viability. American nuclear power plants are closing at a historically unprecedented pace, and there’s little evidence of public or political will to stop the bleeding. Recognizing the nuclear industry’s flaws, the authors argue that nuclear energy is widely misunderstood. They discuss the nuclear industry’s failure to capture the public’s attention and imagination, and survey the new national conversation about America’s renewable energy future — a conversation that does not include nuclear. For all these challenges, the authors argue that permanently opting out of the nuclear enterprise would be a mistake. Making the case for continued nuclear investment, they show how “keeping the lights on” at America’s nuclear plants can bolster American technology leadership, security, and commitment to curbing carbon emissions. They offer a menu of policy options designed to spur meaningful action at state and federal levels, to change the industry’s status quo, and to reintroduce nuclear to America’s energy conversation.

The Watchman’s Rattle: Thinking Our Way Out of Extinction by Rebecca Costa, 2010

“Problems eventually become too complicated for the average intelligence — in The Watchman’s Rattle, Rebecca Costa depicts the challenges this presents.” — Dr. James Watson, Nobel Laureate

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Power to Save the World: The Truth about Nuclear Energy, by Gwyneth Cravens, 2007, with an introduction by Richard Rhodes.

“Let’s hope this clear-eyed, up-to-date tour of all things nuclear . . . sparks a renewed nationwide debate.” — WIRED

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Unintended Consequences: The Lie that killed millions and accelerated Climate Change, by George Erickson, 2017

In Unintended Consequences, best-selling author George Erickson exposes the lie that created our extreme radiation safety standards, the damage those regulations have caused, and his contempt for “greens” who profit from promoting 30% efficient, carbon-reliant solar panels and bird, bat and human-killing, CO2-producing windmills, but oppose environment-friendly, CO2-free, 90% efficient safe, nuclear power. — Dr. Alex Cannara

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Nuclear Energy: What Everyone Needs to Know, by Charles D. Ferguson, 2011 by Oxford University Press. Charles D. Ferguson is President of the Federation of American Scientists and an Adjunct Professor in Georgetown University’s Security Studies Program. Trained as a physicist and nuclear engineer, he has worked on nuclear policy issues at the U.S. Department of State and the Council on Foreign Relations.

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Drawdown: The Most Comprehensive Plan Ever Proposed to Reverse Global Warming, by Paul Hawken and Tom Steyer, 2017

“The stakes for our planet have never been higher. The world is warming, sea levels are rising, and the impacts of climate change are occurring faster and stronger than originally predicted. It is a global crisis with no place for partisan rhetoric, requiring solutions at every scale and across every sector.” — Tom Steyer

Earth: The Sequel: The Race to Reinvent Energy and Stop Global Warming, by Fred Krupp and Miriam Horn, 2008, 2009. Fred Krupp is the president of Environmental Defense Fund.

“Krupp and Horn have delivered an important message of hope: that alternative energy is abundant, we have the genius to tap it, and there is no need to continue wrecking the world by dependence on fossil fuels.” — E.O. Wilson, University Research Professor Emeritus, Harvard University

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Sustainable Energy — Without the Hot Air, by David J.C. MacKay, published December 2, 2008 (UK) and May 1, 2009 (USA), now available online. David MacKay was appointed a Lecturer in the Department of Physics at Cambridge in 1995 and Professor in the Department of Physics from 2003 to 2013. From 2005 on, he devoted his time to public teaching about energy. In 2009, David MacKay was appointed Chief Scientific Advisor to the Department of Energy and Climate Change.

“For anyone with influence on energy policy, whether in government, business or a campaign group, this book should be compulsory reading.” — Tony Juniper,former Executive Director, Friends of the Earth

Most of us recognize that climate change is real yet we do nothing to stop it. What is the psychological mechanism that allows us to know something is true but act as if it is not? George Marshall’s search for the answers brings him face to face with Nobel Prize-winning psychologists and Texas Tea Party activists; the world’s leading climate scientists and those who denounce them; liberal environmentalists and conservative evangelicals. What he discovers is that our values, assumptions, and prejudices can take on lives of their own, gaining authority as they are shared, dividing people in their wake.

Seeing the Light: The Case for Nuclear Power in the 21st Century, by Scott Montgomery and Thomas Graham, Jr., Sept. 2017

Provides a comprehensive treatment on nuclear energy, its history, culture, present status and possible future. The authors are credible, authoritative, academically rigorous yet readable and accessible, and objective. They identify what is the most pressing challenge of our times, namely the unspoken message of the refusal by some to deny a role for nuclear in a noncarbon future: that “lowering carbon emissions and advancing a noncarbon future that will mitigate climate change are not the ultimate goals at issue. Indeed, climate change itself is not the fundamental motive. Instead, the underlying aim appears to meore ideaological — to employ renewable energy as the builder of a new society, one that is ‘clean,’ ethically superior, without risk, washing away a past that has been a denial to all these good things . . . .”

Climate Gamble: Is Anti-Nuclear Activism Endangering Our Future?, by Rauli Partanen and Janne M. Korhonen, 2017.

“Preventing dangerous climate change requires world energy production to be almost completely free from fossil fuels by 2050. At the same time, energy consumption keeps growing, as the population increases and those mired in poverty try to create better lives for themselves. With almost 87 percent of our energy produced with fossil fuels, the challenge is unprecedented in both its scale and urgency. International organization agree that meeting this challenge will require the use of all the tools at our disposal: Renewable energy, more energy conservation and better efficiency, Carbon capture and storage — and nuclear power.”